UK COPYRIGHT LAW

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Re: UK COPYRIGHT LAW

Post by Mike Stranks »

Sam Spoons wrote:Who was that to Mike? MCPS?

PRS...

https://www.prsformusic.com/licences/using-music-online/limited-online-music-licence

I did get a free logo to use on my sites though! :)
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Re: UK COPYRIGHT LAW

Post by Sam Spoons »

Thanks, we have a PRS/PPL licence to use recorded music for live classes but online is different. The person we spoke to at PRS/PPL said they couldn't licence music for online classes/lessons :headbang:
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Re: UK COPYRIGHT LAW

Post by TJ1 »

I guess what a lot f people want is the peace of mind to know that their copyright is protected, before the seek to put their work in the public domain.

I realize it would cost more money than the simple sealed envelope route: but lets say you had a couple of sheets of paper with your music and lyrics on it.

If you got any solicitor/lawyer for lets say £30-50 to date stamp it and confirm they had sight of the document -before sending it to yourself, would that give you additional protection?

I am not really talking about getting the services of a high priced music lawyer, rather any above shop wills/beneficiary solicitor who has experience of attesting to the authenticity of documents.
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Re: UK COPYRIGHT LAW

Post by MOF »

I then started thinking about the sealed polythene envelopes that you get on parcels that you cannot simply open or steam open.

It doesn’t stop unscrupulous individuals sending those types of envelopes, unsealed, to themselves and later enclosing their ripped off composition materials in the envelope then sealing it properly.
I used to send my compositions on cassette to myself and put stamps across one end of the envelope seal and the Recorded Delivery stamp across the other end. It occurred to me at the time that it wasn’t 100% infallible as proof.
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Re: UK COPYRIGHT LAW

Post by CS70 »

TJ1 wrote:I guess what a lot f people want is the peace of mind to know that their copyright is protected, before the seek to put their work in the public domain.

I realize it would cost more money than the simple sealed envelope route: but lets say you had a couple of sheets of paper with your music and lyrics on it.

If you got any solicitor/lawyer for lets say £30-50 to date stamp it and confirm they had sight of the document -before sending it to yourself, would that give you additional protection?

I am not really talking about getting the services of a high priced music lawyer, rather any above shop wills/beneficiary solicitor who has experience of attesting to the authenticity of documents.

I guess nowadays your best bet is to simply upload to an independent large third party service (which essentially means YT and similar).

In case of litigation (outside the US) it's all about who has more arguments, and an independent timestamp that cannot be easily tampered with by both parties is probably hard to beat - and costs nothing.

The laywer thing, I don't think it would be much better than the envelope. I think few judges think that lawyers are saints and a lawyer word would mean little, because it's far easier to tamper with than a completely independent, neutral upload page. Especially when there's significant money at stake - like there must be for a litigation to make sense.

In certain countries you have notaries whose professional job is exactly to act as good faith witnesses (and they get paid pretty well for that!) and in many others their function is replaced by government officials.. however, they tend to enter the picture for existing, concrete transactions, and for something like a recording the chain of custody would be hard to maintain (unless there's a dedicated government office... cue the US Copyright Office).

Maybe if you deposited in a bank..

So imho a lawyer would be a waste of money.
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Re: UK COPYRIGHT LAW

Post by TJ1 »

I guess nowadays your best bet is to simply upload to an independent large third party service (which essentially means YT and similar).

In case of litigation (outside the US) it's all about who has more arguments, and an independent timestamp that cannot be easily tampered with by both parties is probably hard to beat - and costs nothing.

The laywer thing, I don't think it would be much better than the envelope. I think few judges think that lawyers are saints and a lawyer word would mean little, because it's far easier to tamper with than a completely independent, neutral upload page. Especially when there's significant money at stake - like there must be for a litigation to make sense.

In certain countries you have notaries whose professional job is exactly to act as good faith witnesses (and they get paid pretty well for that!) and in many others their function is replaced by government officials.. however, they tend to enter the picture for existing, concrete transactions, and for something like a recording the chain of custody wo

uld be hard to maintain (unless there's a dedicated government office... cue the US Copyright Office).

Maybe if you deposited in a bank..

So imho a lawyer would be a waste of money.

Thank you that is very helpful, I only raised the lawyer issue because it seems the consensus in this discussion and on other sites is that posting it to yourself does not seem alone to constitute a guaranteed method of establishing copyright in many courts.
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Re: UK COPYRIGHT LAW

Post by chrisnubile »

I’m interested to know… without stating the bleeding obvious, but in this day and age of all of the relevant data being digital files, surely presentation of the original recordings and demos etc which would have digital time stamps on the files that predate anyone else’s would suffice as evidence?

So if at the point of recording we back up to one or more removable secure media and/or a secure cloud service, surely we have time stamped ‘archives’ we can wheel out of need be?
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Re: UK COPYRIGHT LAW

Post by Wonks »

Trusted 3rd party storage maybe, but as it’s easy enough to set your own computer clock to any time and date you want it to be, and so create a file stamped with that time, your own digital archives would probably not be considered reliable enough.

Files stored in the cloud should be stamped locally with the time the files were created, so bar some serious hacking skills, that should be considered as evidence of the date they were uploaded. But you’d need to check if any of this has been tested in case law before relying on it 100%.
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Re: UK COPYRIGHT LAW

Post by Folderol »

At one time the recommendation was to make a physical copy and leave it with a solicitor - but that gets expensive!
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