Good Reading Suggestions

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Re: Good Reading Suggestions

Post by Funkyflash5 »

Any idea if there's much of a difference between 5th and 6th editions of the Master Handbook of Acoustics? I can get the 5th edition right away for half as much as the 6th, but I'd put the 6th on my watchlist if it's a major update.
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Re: Good Reading Suggestions

Post by Hugh Robjohns »

The Seventh edition is due in October, so it might be wise to continue saving for a few month and buy that.

I think the 6th edition added more on home studio acoustics and construction, but that's hearsay rather than based on a hands-on review.

I still rely on the 4th edition here...
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Re: Good Reading Suggestions

Post by Mixedup »

The Culprit wrote: Thu Jul 15, 2021 9:03 pmAny general content to do with room acoustics, electronics in music, microphone design...anything geeky like that.

It's a big topic... the list could be endless... and I'll hold up my hands and say that while I've read a lot I'm crap at this stuff in practice :headbang::lol::lol::lol:

But, as well as the other recommendations above...

Richard Brice's books are a great way to dive into a broad cross-section of audio gear.

And Douglas Self's Small Signal Audio Design is essential reading

And some reading up on both power-supply design and filtering is probably a good idea too, if you've not gone there already.
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Re: Good Reading Suggestions

Post by The Culprit »

Mixedup wrote: Tue Jul 20, 2021 12:25 pmIt's a big topic... the list could be endless... and I'll hold up my hands and say that while I've read a lot I'm crap at this stuff in practice :headbang::lol::lol::lol:

Haha yeah I get that, it's a pretty extensive warren :lol:

Acoustics is probably my main pursuit the now, would like to be ready for if I ever find the means to build a wee studio. That said those Richard Brice books do look excellent, they are definitely on the list.

Thanks to all of you for your help :thumbup:
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Re: Good Reading Suggestions

Post by merlyn »

The Culprit wrote: Thu Jul 15, 2021 9:03 pm
My first issue is the requirement of a good knowledge of complex numbers. After an hour or so on YouTube I've come to realise that I must not have been in that day at school 20-odd years ago :shocked:


If you've got some spare time you could learn complex numbers and how they apply to waves. If you learn this you will have a good understanding of phase. At the very least this will mean you can have a laugh at some of the questions about phase, like "How do I get the bass in phase with the drums" :D

If complex numbers were covered at your school it would be the arithmetic and algebra of complex numbers, which is a necessary background, but it's not obvious how that relates to waves. That's more advanced and is in this equation :
Image

A complex number can represent a sinusoid, and when doing this the vector in the complex plane is called a phasor :

Image

By Gonfer at English Wikipedia, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.p ... d=11313700

Learning how complex numbers relate to waves would be relevant to acoustics because you can use the e^i*theta notation for sound waves. Phase angle now makes sense because it's the angle between phasors as can be seen here with three phasors producing three sinusoids with different amplitudes and phases :

Image

By Gonfer - en wikipedia, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=7026837

Learn this and be forever entertained by the endless questions about phase. :lol:
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Re: Good Reading Suggestions

Post by Hugh Robjohns »

Nice graphics!
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Re: Good Reading Suggestions

Post by The Culprit »

merlyn wrote: Wed Aug 11, 2021 3:27 pm
The Culprit wrote: Thu Jul 15, 2021 9:03 pm
My first issue is the requirement of a good knowledge of complex numbers. After an hour or so on YouTube I've come to realise that I must not have been in that day at school 20-odd years ago :shocked:


If you've got some spare time you could learn complex numbers and how they apply to waves. If you learn this you will have a good understanding of phase. At the very least this will mean you can have a laugh at some of the questions about phase, like "How do I get the bass in phase with the drums" :D

If complex numbers were covered at your school it would be the arithmetic and algebra of complex numbers, which is a necessary background, but it's not obvious how that relates to waves. That's more advanced and is in this equation :
Image

A complex number can represent a sinusoid, and when doing this the vector in the complex plane is called a phasor :

Image

By Gonfer at English Wikipedia, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.p ... d=11313700

Learning how complex numbers relate to waves would be relevant to acoustics because you can use the e^i*theta notation for sound waves. Phase angle now makes sense because it's the angle between phasors as can be seen here with three phasors producing three sinusoids with different amplitudes and phases :

Image

By Gonfer - en wikipedia, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=7026837

Learn this and be forever entertained by the endless questions about phase. :lol:

Wow this is...complex :lol:

Thanks for taking the time to post this, excellent reference point to be aware of :thumbup:
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