Frequency Response Sensitivity - Any Charts out there for well known reference speakers?

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Re: Frequency Response Sensitivity - Any Charts out there for well known reference speakers?

Post by RichardT »

I monitor as flat as possible, though it took me a while to get used to the sound. I'm using Sonarworks to achieve this and not relying on the speakers' frequency response. As I have lots of room treatment, to get a flat spectrum at the listening position I have an upward slope in the HF in Sonarworks which is larger than any voicing curve would be.

I'm not sure this is right - but I think I've read that the voicing curves in hi-fi speakers are designed to counteract the unbalancing effect of untreated rooms.
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Re: Frequency Response Sensitivity - Any Charts out there for well known reference speakers?

Post by Hugh Robjohns »

RichardT wrote: Mon Sep 27, 2021 12:08 pm...I think I've read that the voicing curves in hi-fi speakers are designed to counteract the unbalancing effect of untreated rooms.

To a degree -- there are other aspects to it as well.

But the tonal balance we perceive is derived from a combination of the direct sound (nominally flat) and the reflected sound within the room. In an untreated room, the reflected sound may tend to be fairly bright, while in a heavily treated room it could be very dull.

But it's more complicated still as some of the reflected sound comes from the direct sound passing over the listener and bouncing off walls and objects in the room, while a larger proportion also comes from the off-axis sound radiated from the speaker cabinets and that often has a very 'unbalanced' tonality.

That's why it's so important when choosing new speakers to listen to them in your own room, as the room's acoustics determine how much off-axis sound is brought back to the listener, affecting the perceived tonal balance dramatically. Speakers with well balanced off-axis contributions tend to work more consistently in different rooms, while those with 'lumpy' off-axis responses tend to be quite fussy....

As I have lots of room treatment, to get a flat spectrum at the listening position I have an upward slope in the HF in Sonarworks which is larger than any voicing curve would be

In a 'well treated' room there will be relatively little return from the boundaries and so only the direct sound is heard. If the speaker has a flat response it shouldn't need a rising EQ to achieve a flat response at the listening position.

Of course, if the speaker has been 'voiced' to take into account reflected HF from a more lively space the on-axis HF response may well be curtailed somewhat and hence need compensation.

But there are so many interacting factors involved in achieving a perceived 'flat' reproduction that it's impossible to pick on any one as being the most important.
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Re: Frequency Response Sensitivity - Any Charts out there for well known reference speakers?

Post by Lophophora »

There are also higher end speakers with cardioid polar patterns in the low end, which helps a lot in minimizing the room influence. Kii Three and Dutch & Dutch 8C are popular among mastering engineers these days.
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Re: Frequency Response Sensitivity - Any Charts out there for well known reference speakers?

Post by dawzilla »

I am now thinking a cardioid sub-woofer to go alongside my dual concentric speakers in a "as well treated as i possibly can" space. The Tannoy 8's appeal to my lackluster budget at the moment. I also own some Mackie HR824's MK1's bought "from a pawn shop" untested (I can repair these easily if needed - electrical engineering family + friends) - I just liked the idea of owning another set of something to compare these against - hence Adams or Tannoys and the comments about the build quality of the Adams I have had from some owners put me off a bit.... But I am still undecided. £200 a speaker is my budget, with probably £400 for a sub later.

I will also be investing in a decent reference mic for REW and of course trying to "treat reflections" "bass build up" etc... Biggest problem being I see is that I am:

Renting a home, given what I get (being on benefits for disability) and working with materials that are "off the shelf" RE acoustic treatments.

I don't want an anabolic chamber :D

Thanks ever so much folk for the information here - means a lot!
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